People

Molecular Analysis Facility

Professor, Bioengineering and Chemical Engineering; Director, Molecular Analysis Facility

David Castner

Professor, Bioengineering and Chemical Engineering; Director, Molecular Analysis Facility
castner@uw.edu | 206-543-8094

Our research is directed at obtaining detailed information about the surface composition and structure of biomaterials and the interaction of biomolecules with those biomaterials. Recent advances have made it possible to control chemistry on a local scale undreamed of only a few years ago. The dimensions of the lateral chemical variations are diminishing, the complexity of the molecules being introduced at the surface is increasing, and the manipulations of the surface moieties become ever more sophisticated. These advances offer great challenges and opportunities for biomedical surface analysis.

Research Associate Professor, Bioengineering; Associate Director, Molecular Analysis Facility

Lara Gamble

Research Associate Professor, Bioengineering; Associate Director, Molecular Analysis Facility
gamble@nb.uw.edu | 206-616-4173

Dr. Gamble’s research focuses on surface modification and characterization of model biomedical systems including fundamental research towards the preparation and characterization of DNA and protein microarrays. She is also involved in the development of new techniques that will enable improved analysis of the biomolecule-surface interface and improved chemical imaging of biologically relevant samples.

Molecular Engineering & Sciences Institute

Professor, Chemical Engineering; Associate Director of Education, Molecular Engineering & Sciences Institute

René Overney

Professor, Chemical Engineering; Associate Director of Education, Molecular Engineering & Sciences Institute
roverney@u.washington.edu | 206-543-4353

Research in Overney’s Lab focuses on obtaining a fundamental understanding of material functionalities involving nano-confined complex molecular systems. We are particularly interested in i) identifying basic internal and external constraints that are responsible for “unique” material and transport properties, and ii) applying knowledge of molecular- and nano-constraints to material engineering in a rational fashion, with focus on the molecular building blocks, their subunits, and their temporal and spatial mobilities.

Professor, Bioengineering; Director, Molecular Engineering & Sciences Institute

Patrick Stayton

Professor, Bioengineering; Director, Molecular Engineering & Sciences Institute
stayton@u.washington.edu | 206-685-8148

Our group is interested in elucidating the fundamental mechanisms of biomolecular recognition and applying the unique capabilities of biological molecules to biotechnologies. We would like to bridge the gap between understanding molecular structure-function relationships, and to be able to utilize proteins/peptides/DNA for in vivo drug therapies, bioseparations, diagnostics, and biomaterial development.